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SLCB feeds the aged

 June 21, 2017

slbc feed

In continuation of its humanitarian supports to the aged, the government owned Sierra Leone Commercial Bank, on Friday 16 June 2017, donated assorted food items worth over Le20M to the King George’s Home 1V at Grafton in Freetown.

The items include 40 bags rice, 10 bags sugar, 12 bags onions, 28 cartoons salt and 20 gallons.

Making the donation, the Director, Business and Development, Sierra Leone Commercial Bank, Moses Cumboh Sesay, said the move was not peculiar to the bank, as it habitually donate to the home annually, in order to enhance the welfare of the aged.

He said the bank, which can incontrovertibly boast of being the country’s leading bank with a customer base of over One Hundred and Seventy Thousand, has deemed it fit, to amplify its annual donation to the Home from Le10M to Le20M. This, he said, clearly shows the bank’s commitment in ensuring an improved wellbeing for the aged and sustenance of the Home, as no condition is permanent.

He also assured the aged and management of the bank’s continued support to the Home, as it housed many people that have served the country assiduously in diverse ways.

The proprietor and admin of the King George’s Home, Madam Hannah Deen, though, she thanked the bank for increasing its annual donation to the Home, but however, noted that, the Home is presently constraints with regards payment of salary, as staff had not been paid for the past three months.

This, she said has the proclivity to impact negatively on the entire operations of the Home, which in turn will adversely affect the patients, hence, appealed to the management of the bank and other humanitarian organizations within the country to come to their aid and salvage their plights in order to prevent staff from quitting their job

One of the inmates, while delivering the vote of thanks, also reiterated the appeal made by the proprietor, as they are very apprehensive over their plights since the Home cannot afford to pay its staff for the past three months.

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