Njala University introduces new module

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October 20, 2015 By Memunatu Bangura

With support from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), Njala University College (NUC) has introduced a new module called an ‘Introduction of Food and Nutrition Security and the Right to Food’.

According toDr. Margaret Wagah, FAO’s Chief Technical Advisor, the introduction of the module was recommended in January 2013 during a training of civil servants and civil society activists on the concept of Food and Nutrition Security (FNS) and Right to Food (RtF).

She said the course was introduced at Njala University because most agricultural officers that are recruited by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security are trained in the university.

Dr. Wagah said the recommendation led to series of engagements between the FAO and Njala University for both technical and financial support for the introduction of the module. She explained that the two institutions have developed the new module and FAO has already hired an international consultant to work with the academic staff in the School of Agriculture and related fields to teach the module to students in various departments.

“The consultant is currently training trainers that will help lecturers who are expected to teach the module to be exposed to appropriate teaching methodology and learning materials,” she disclosed.

Dr. Wagah noted that the new module is expected to place future graduates in a better position in contributing towards addressing food and nutrition insecurity in Sierra Leone, adding that it would further expose students to the concepts of Food and Nutrition Security (FNS) and Right to Food (RtF) principles in ensuring that they are aware of the importance of adopting farming techniques that support nutrition standards in the country.

She maintained that: “Agriculture is potentially one of the sectors that can transform Sierra Leone’s socio-economic development,” adding that: “The country is blessed with good weather, virgin soils and expansive unexploited land.”


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