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“Singing can make learning interesting”

-British Council Director

April 4, 2017 By Ibrahim Tarawallie

“Singing and songs are so important for everybody to learn. Whether you are learning English, Mathematics or whatever, singing, especially songs can make learning even more interesting,” says Country Director of British Council, Simon Ingram-Hill.

Mr. Ingram-Hill was speaking last Friday (March 31) during a performance by selected primary school pupils and teachers at the St. Joseph Primary School in Freetown.

The British Council is currently implementing a project titled: “World Voice”, whereby song will be used as a medium of instruction in the classrooms, thereby making learning better and interesting.

The project is at the stage, where the council is working with primary schools across the Freetown municipality to provide them with the necessary skills needed to ensure the inclusion of music in schools.

Mr. Ingram-Hill stated that because they wanted  to have more opportunities to have singing and songs in the classroom, they were working with the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology for the inclusion of music and songs in the curricula.

“When I came to Sierra Leone, I find that everybody sings. Kids need songs and we need to get it into the primary schools. We know how important song is and we have seen many times in this country how wonderful kids sing,” he said.

According to him, singing in the classroom will help in showing how song can be useful to learning in mathematics, English and social science, among others, because it makes learning have lots of fun.

Sharon Dtrand, a United Kingdom music trainer, stated that the World Voice was all over many countries.

She started working with  some of the pupils in primary schools, before training teachers on pedagogy, how to break down songs and leadership skills, among others.

“Music and singing will give the best opportunity for learning in schools,” she said.

In January this year, thirty-five (35) teachers from Milton Margai College of Education and Technology, Freetown Teachers College and schools in the western area were trained in Bo under the World Voce project.

From the above number, 20 teachers were selected, who recently concluded master training and will be used to cascade the project across schools.