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‘My intention is to bring change’

-Chief Sam Sumana

March 14, 2018 By Mohamed Massaquoi

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Chief Sam-Sumana is presidential candidate for C4C

Former Vice President and presidential candidate for Coalition for Change (C4C) in the just concluded presidential election has told our reporter in an interview that he has no grudge against any individual, but rather  the purpose of forming a new political party was to foster positive political change in the country.

Chief Alhaji Samuel Sam-Sumana said: “I don’t have room for grudge. If I focus on grudge I will not focus on the vision of the equalisation for change. My intention is to bring change in Sierra Leone,” he said.

Many political analysts had predicted that the hard-fought presidential election would go into run-off between Retired Brigadier Julius Maada Bio of the main opposition Sierra Leone Peoples Party (SLPP) and the ruling All Peoples Congress (APC) Dr. Samura Matthew Wilson Kamara.

Alhaji Sam Sumana and his C4C party are one of the kingmakers after the party reported took seven out of nine parliamentary seats in his home district of Kono.

Chief   Sam-Sumana told our reporter that he had always supported constitutionality, having served as Vice President of the country before he was controversially sacked by President Ernest Bai Koroma.

He said the action by the ruling APC to ‘arbitrarily’ remove him from office was very disheartening, yet he decided to give peace a chance for the love of the country.

“For me, C4C is not a party to seek grudge, revenge or whatever,” said Chief Sam-Sumana, adding that he has investing his time into essential services for Sierra Leoneans.

“Sierra Leone was once known as the ‘Athens of West Africa.’ We have lost that position. We have to re-ignite that, especially with what happened with the civil war which created a large number of illiterates in our country.”

Aside winning more than two-thirds of parliamentary seats in Kono district, C4C candidates also won the mayoral and district chairmanship, making them the third party in parliament in terms of representation.