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Kenyan leader calls for democratization of UN Security Council

NOVEMBER 20, 2014 By Abdul Karim Koroma in Addis Ababa

The Kenyan President on Monday (17th November) called on the United Nations to democratize the Security Council in a bid to allow Africa to have a say in the global organization.

President Uhuru Kenyatta made the call at the preparatory meeting of the African Union Committee of Ten (C-10) Foreign Ministers and Permanent Representatives, which took place in Nairobi, Kenya.

In his opening statement, Mr. Kenyatta said the current composition of the Security Council must be reformed to make Africa’s voice heard in the Council. “The Security Council is the principal organ responsible for maintaining international peace and security – best exemplifies a structure that is not compatible with the current realities of the world,” he said

President Kenyatta pointed out that the current composition of the Security Council does not reflect the current world power distribution and geo-political situation. “The inequality and lack of democracy in UN representation had led to inconsistencies, inefficiency and marginalization of the world’s vulnerable communities, and severely betrayed its largest constituency–the less developed countries,” he noted.

The Kenyan leader also accused Western superpowers of turning a blind eye to Africa.

Leader of Sierra Leone’s delegation and Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Co-operation, Dr. Samura Kamara, in his welcome address, gave a comprehensive overview of the current state of affairs in the United Nations Security Council Reform process.

He stated that Sierra Leone, as Coordinator, plus the nine other C-10 member countries, are entrusted with the task of canvassing support for the African Common Position, as enshrined in the Ezulwini Consensus and the Sirte Declaration.

These two documents, he emphasized, seek to correct the historical injustice done to Africa for not being represented as a permanent member of the UN Security Council.

According to Dr. Kamara, Africa is requesting for two seats in the permanent category of the United Nations Security Council, plus an increase in Africa’s representation in the non-permanent category. “Today more than ever is the time for Africa to unite in purpose and action to increase its voice and participation at the highest decision making levels in global governance,” he stated.

The C-10 meeting in Nairobi, which was a further consultation and stock-taking exercise, was preceded by the first ever Summit of the African Union Committee of Ten Heads of State and Government on United Nations Security Council Reform, held in the Republic of Congo, which was chaired by President Ernest Bai Koroma, Coordinator of the C-10 Heads of State.